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For Immediate Release
May 19, 2010

Washington Post Ad Hits Humane Society of the United States for Misallocating Donor Funds Watchdog Will Shut Down Website if HSUS Gives Just 50 Percent of its Income to Underfunded Pet Shelters


Washington, DC - A full-page ad in this morning's Washington Post highlights the failure of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) to donate a significant portion of the public's donations to America's underfunded dog and cat shelters. And the sponsor of the ad, the nonprofit Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF), is pledging to shut down its popular HumaneWatch.org <http://www.humanewatch.org>  website if HSUS CEO Wayne Pacelle donates just 50 percent of his group's income to hands-on pet shelters in the United States. In February, HumaneWatch exposed HSUS's practice of giving less than half of one percent of its budget to dog and cat shelters.

HumaneWatch is a CCF watchdog website devoted to analyzing HSUS's activities. In just twelve...

Last Updated (Friday, 30 July 2010 07:38)

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For Immediate Release:
May 19, 2010

Contact:
Ashley Byrne 757-622-7382

Oak Brook, Ill. -- Wearing buttons emblazoned with the words "Stop McCruelty," five PETA members in chicken costumes will greet shareholders attending the McDonald's annual meeting in Oak Brook on Thursday. Other PETA members will hold signs that read, "Scalded Alive" and "Broken Wings and Legs." PETA wants the company to heed the advice of its own animal welfare advisors and order its suppliers to switch to a less cruel method of chicken slaughter that has been approved by the U.S Department of Agriculture and that is already used by several of McDonald's European suppliers. Inside the meeting, a representative of PETA, which owns stock in McDonald's, will speak in support of PETA's shareholder resolution calling on the company to switch to the less cruel method:

When: Thursday, May 20, 10 a.m.
Where: Outside McDonald's campus, 2915 Jorie Blvd., Oak Brook (at the...

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By Jane Black

Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, May 19, 2010

It's probably no surprise that Sir Paul McCartney, a longtime vegetarian, banned all meat from staff meals on his current world tour. But when Mario Batali starts to push people to eat their vegetables, you know something is happening.

The famously rotund and infamously gluttonous chef-restaurateur is to pig what the Beatles are to rock-and-roll. Batali, a rock-star chef if there ever was one, has changed the way Americans eat pork, introducing us to cured lonza, guanciale and lardo, which he once described to the New Yorker magazine as "the best song sung in the key of pig."

And yet this month, Batali announced that he would join the Meatless Monday campaign, a movement backed by a broad array of public-health advocates, animal welfare activists and environmentalists that asks carnivores to give up meat one day a week. Each of Batali's 14 restaurants, which include the meatily named...

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19 May 2010A representative of PETA, which is a Safeway shareholder, will present a resolution to executives at the company's annual meeting to accommodate specific poultry welfare standards.

PETA wants Safeway to purchase all its turkeys from suppliers that use what PETA believes is a less cruel method of poultry slaughter, being controlled-atmosphere killing (CAK) by the end of 2010. It will also require its chicken suppliers to switch to CAK within 5 years.

Safeway already buys some turkey from suppliers that use CAK, but PETA wants the company to commit to taking action to fully eliminate the "worst abuses that chickens and turkeys endure".

"Safeway has started making animal welfare reforms, but it is time for the company to put a timeline on its commitments to improve conditions for the chickens and turkeys who end up on its shelves," says PETA Executive VP Tracy Reiman. "Consumers care about animal welfare, so the best thing that any business can do is...

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Down the Dusty Lane

By Kyle Sharp

OK, survey time ... how many of you like eating at Chipotle?

I’ll admit, I enjoy the occasional Chipotle burrito myself, although I often somehow felt dirty after eating one. Why? Because of the information Chipotle distributes on their Web site and in their restaurants about how they source the meat they use. I have no problem with them using all naturally raised pork and chicken, and 50% naturally raised beef, if that is what they choose to do. It’s their habit of slandering conventional American agriculture in the process that doesn’t sit so well.

On the Chipotle Web site, the company touts the idea of making "Food With Integrity.” The site states: "Food

With Integrity is a philosophy solidly based on a foundation of not exploiting animals, the environment or people.”

The not-so-hidden message there is that most U.S. farmers, those that produce more than 95% of the meat and animal products produced in this...

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